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Main page  Observations

G2CCD-0400 Deep Sky Images
 First shots with the production G2CCD-0400 camera show its capability to capture beautiful images of deep sky objects.

Although Kamil Hornoch uses his 35 cm (approx. 13.8 inch) f/4.7 Newtonian telescope primarily for comet photometry and for hunting novae in M31 galaxy, using of CCD camera with integrated filter wheel and LRGB filters installed encouraged him to try to shot some deep sky wonders. Here are some example images.

M1 Crab Nebula

M1 is the expanding cloud of gas (known as “Crab Nebula”), created when the star exploded as supernova. The explosion was observed in the year 1054 AD. The M1 nebula is 6,000 light years apart.

M1 Crab Nebula

M1 “Crab Nebula”

Date January 24th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 50 min 1 × 1
Red 20 min 2 × 2
Green 20 min 2 × 2
Blue 25 min 2 × 2

M3

Almost million of stars at a distance of about 33,900 light years packed at a sphere approximately 180 light years across form a beautiful globular cluster marked M3.

M3 globular cluster

M3 globular cluster

Date January 25th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 5.5 min 1 × 1
Red 5 min 2 × 2
Green 8.5 min 2 × 2
Blue 12.5 min 2 × 2

M13 Hercules Globular Cluster

The famous globular cluster M13 in the constellation Hercules belongs among the best know deep-sky objects on the Northern celestial hemisphere. It is easily visible in almost any binocular and typical amateur telescope usually resolves individual stars on the cluster border, which creates beautiful views even for unexperienced observer. The cluster distance is 25,100 light years and angular diameter is 15'.

M13 Hercules Globular Cluster

M13 “Hercules Globular Cluster”

Date March 19th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 5 min 40 sec 1 × 1
Red 5 min 20 sec 2 × 2
Green 7 min 2 × 2
Blue 9 min 2 × 2

M42 Great Orion Nebula

Maybe the most famous nebula on the sky in the constellation Orion (called “Great Orion Nebula”) can be easily seen by naked eyes. Capturing this large and bright object on a relatively small CCD chip is not easy. It was necessary to stack many short exposure images to minimize CCD chip blooming cause by bright stars.

M42 Great Orion Nebula

M42 “Great Orion Nebula”

Date January 25th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 146 s (73 × 2 s) 1 × 1
Red 150 s (30 × 5 s) 2 × 2
Green 150 s (30 × 5 s) 2 × 2
Blue 330 s (33 × 10 s) 2 × 2

M76 Little Dumbbell Nebula

M76 planetary nebula belongs to the fainter Messier objects. It is also known as “Cork Nebula” or “Butterfly Nebula” due to its shape. The exact distance of this planetary nebula is unknown, estimates are between 1,700 and 15,000 light years.

M76 Little Dumbbell Nebula

M76 “Little Dumbbell Nebula”

Date January 28th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 60 min 1 × 1
Red 22 min 2 × 2
Green 21 min 2 × 2
Blue 20 min 2 × 2

M81 Bode's Galaxy

M81 is one of the brightest galaxy on the sky. It is easy to observe even in small telescope, but its spiral structure can be revealed only on the photograph or CCD image. The distance of M81 is 11.0 million light years.

M81 Bode's Galaxy

M81 Bode's Galaxy

Date January 28th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 61 min 1 × 1
Red 40 min 2 × 2
Green 41 min 2 × 2
Blue 40 min 2 × 2

M82 Cigar Galaxy

M82 can be spotted very close to much bigger M81 galaxy. It passed even closer to heavier M81 in history and the gravitational field distorted its structure.

M82 was considered Irregular galaxy, by it is probably spiral galaxy viewed from the edge. The complicated structure of dark lanes is caused by the gravitational influence of its heavy neighbor.

M82 Cigar Galaxy

M82 Cigar Galaxy

Date January 28th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 58 min 1 × 1
Red 25 min 2 × 2
Green 25 min 2 × 2
Blue 25 min 2 × 2

M97 Owl Nebula

The name of M97 planetary nebula—Owl Nebula—was assigned by Lord Rosse and it really fits its appearance. Two dark areas resemble big eyes in the owl head. The central star brightness is 16m. The distance of this object is uncertain, various authors mention distances from 1,300 to 12,000 light years.

M97 Owl Nebula

M97 “Owl Nebula”

Date January 27th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 60 min 1 × 1
Red 25 min 2 × 2
Green 28 min 2 × 2
Blue 61 min 2 × 2

NGC 2392 Eskimo Nebula

Angularly small planetary nebula NGC 2392 was named Eskimo nebula because it resembles a face surrounded by a hood. It was discovered by William Herschel in1787. The nebula distance is estimated to 3,000 to 5,000 light years.

The nebula is relatively bright and visible even in small telescopes, but it is hardly distinguishable from a star when observed at low magnification—its angular dimension is only 0.8' × 0.7'. Only 100× and bigger magnification shows the nebulosity around the central star.

NGC 2392 Eskimo Nebula

NGC 2392 “Eskimo Nebula”

Date February 27th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 15 s 1 × 1
Red 20 s 2 × 2
Green 20 s 2 × 2
Blue 20 s 2 × 2

NGC 2419

NGC 2419 is relatively unknown globular cluster in the constellation Lynx. It is 295,000 light years away so it appears very small and dim—its magnitude is only 10.4m and angular diameter is 4.1 arc min.

Although the following luminance-only image was integrated for only 18 minutes, it shows stars up to 20m.

NGC 2419 globular cluster

NGC 2419 globular cluster

Date January 25th, 2006
Filter Exposure Binning
Clear 18 min 1 × 1

All images on this page are courtesy of Kamil Hornoch. Image processing Kamil Hornoch, Vaclav Pribik, Pavel Cagas.

 
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